MARIN FACT SHEETS

Priced Out Fact Sheet

 

Income in Marin

  • Median price in Marin for a single-family home is approximately $1,255,000  as of August 2019.

  • To put this in perspective, the median household income in Novato is $89,812 and $113,908 for Marin as a whole.

 

  • Average rents in San Rafael, Marin’s largest city, stand at $2,585 per month for a 1-bedroom and $2,519 for a 2-bedroom.

 

  • This represents a 64% increase since 2011, where the average 1-bedroom apartment rented for $1,536 per month.

 

  • Even if you take a below-market estimate for a 1-bedroom apartment, let’s say $2,350 per month, you still would need to make an average salary of at least $84,600 to even qualify to rent this apartment, as most landlords require rent to be at least ⅓ of your annual income.

 

  • This is above Marin’s individual median income of $89,812.

 

Homelessness

  • “Marin County has the seventh highest homeless concentration of any county or metropolitan area in the United States”  ​​

  • There is an estimated 1,117 total homeless in Marin county overall based on a comprehensive 2017 survey, a 36% increase since 2015.

 

  • 71% of the homeless had lived in Marin County before becoming homeless, with 53% having lived in Marin for a decade or longer.

 

  • Only 9% of the reported homeless population had lived in Marin for less than a year, dispelling the notion that most of our homeless are simply “traveling bums.” While these folks certainly exist, they are in the minority.

 

  • 68% were male and 31% female, with an additional 1% citing “other.”

 

  • The most represented demographic in terms of age were between the ages of 25-39, making up 39% of the recorded homeless.

 

  • The second most represented demographic were 40-64 year olds at 29% followed by 18-24 year olds at 19%.

 

  • 12% were children under the age of 17.

 

  • The majority, 42%, cited economic issues as the primary instigator of their housing insecurity.

 

  • 65% of homeless citizens surveyed cited affordable housing as the thing they most needed in order to obtain a permanent residence.

 

…….MEANWHILE…….

 

County Budget

  • 2,282 government employees were covered by the Budget in 2017-18, an increase from 2,257 in the previous budget. $555 million was the overall county budget for 2017-18, which took effect on July 1st, 2017.

 

  • The new proposed Overall Budget for the following two years stands at $590,929,959 as of June 2018, a 6.37% increase from the previous budget.

  • This increase will allegedly be allocated towards services for the homeless and mentally ill.

 

  • The proposed General Plan budget shows an increase of .5% at $443,119,221, up from about $440 million in 2017-18.

 

 

Property Taxes

  • Marin residents paid a total of $1,046,685,695 in property taxes this fiscal year, an increase of 7.59% from the $972,805,193 paid in 2016-17.

  • In 2018-19 property tax revenue is expected to increase by 5.2%, a much lower increase than previous budgets.

  • The 7.59% increase in tax revenue in 2017-18 was the largest year-to-year increase in the past 10 years except for 2014-15, when tax revenue jumped 8.35 percent.

  • The amount of money that Marin residents will pay in property taxes are expected to top $1 billion for the first time ever in 2018.

  • Property taxes remain the greatest source of revenue for the county.

 

Commuter Fact Sheet

 

Number of Commuters

  • 70,000 workers in Marin commute from other parts of the Bay Area out of a total employed labor force of 137,500 in 2018. That means roughly 60% of Marin’s labor force doesn’t even live in Marin.

 

  • On top of this, the majority of workers commuting from other counties either work in blue-collar or unskilled service positions.

 

  • These jobs generally pay well below Marin’s 2018 median income of 82,900, making living here impossible for the people who make our economy function.

 

Time Spent Commuting

  • In 2016, 12.4% of workforce commuters to Marin spent between 45-59 minutes commuting to work compared to 8.8% in California as a whole.

 

  • 11.8% of commuters to Marin spent between 60-89 minutes commuting to work compared to 8.3% of California as a whole.

 

  • 4% of the Marin workforce spends 90 minutes or more commuting compared to 2.8% of the U.S population as a whole.

 

  • 11.1% of workers in Marin work from home compared to 6.3% in the greater Bay Area and 5% in the U.S as a whole.

 

Where are commuters coming from?

  • Sonoma: 28%

  • San Francisco: 24%

  • West Contra Costa: 14%

  • North Alameda: 13%

  • East Contra Costa: 7%
  • Solano: 5%

  • Napa: 3%

  • South Alameda: 2%

 

  • In Novato, 22.1% of all workers come from Sonoma county.

 

  • From 2012 to 2017, traffic on the Richmond-San Rafael bridge increased by about 13% according to the Marin IJ.

 

  • Inbound commuting is rising at a much faster rate than outbound commuting according to Census Bureau data.

 

  • According to the Marin Economic Forum, $7.1 million is lost from 1+ hour commuters.

Demographic Fact Sheet

 

Income Distribution

  • Median annual income by family size in 2018 according to HUD data.​​

    • Household of 4: $118,400

    • Household of 3: $106,550

    • Household of 2: $94,700

    • Individual: $82,900

 

  • For perspective, HUD classifies a family of 4 making $117,400 a year as low income.

 

  • This means that a family of 4 making median income in Marin is just $1,400 away from being low income.

 

  • For an individual, 82,200 is considered low income, meaning that the average person in Marin making a median income is $700 away from low-income status. Remember, this median income calculation includes the super-rich, who skew the data up.

 

  • According to Census Bureau data, the largest demographic living in poverty in Marin are Males between 55-64, followed by Females 25-34 and then Females 55-64.

 

  • Additionally, Marin has the highest Low-Income Displacement Risk in the Bay Area

    • Displacement risk refers to the share of lower-income households living in neighborhoods that have been losing lower-income residents over time.

 

  • This implies that living in Marin is very financially unsafe, particularly for residents between the ages of 55-64.

 

  • Median Individual Income breakdown by Age (2016).

    • Under 25: $34,227

    • 25-44: $65,703

    • 45-64: $108,884

    • Over 65: $86,645

 

  • Bonus Fact: Marin has the highest divorce rate in the Bay Area at 13%.

 

Marin’s Unemployment Rate

January 2017: 3.2%

February 2017: 3%

March 2017: 3%

April 2017: 2.7%

May 2017: 2.6%

June 2017: 3.1%

July 2017: 3.4%

August 2017: 3.4%

September 2017: 2.9%

October 2017: 2.6%

November 2017: 2.2%

December 2017: 2.3%

January 2018: 2.6%

February 2018: 2.5%

March 2018: 2.3%

April 2018: 2.1%

May 2018: 2.0%

June 2018: 2.7%

Population

  • 252,409 total

    • Female Population: 128,337
    • Male Population: 124,072

  • Age breakdown

    • Younger than 5: 4.9%

    • 5-17: 15.5%

    • 18-24: 6.6%

    • 25-34: 8.3%

    • 35-44: 13%

    • 45-54: 15.7%

    • 55-64: 15.4%

    • 65-74: 12.2%

    • 74+: 8.4%

  • Median age: 44
    • Female: 46
    • Male: 43

  • Ethnic breakdown

    • White: 80%

    • Hispanic or Latino: 16.34%

    • Two or more races: 4.41%

    • Asian: 5.68%

    • Black: 2.88%

 

Youth and Elderly Population

  • Persons under 18: 20.5%

  • Students

    • High School: 11,005

    • College: 7,353 (CoM) + 2,306 (Dominican)  = 9,659

    • Total Students: 20,664

  • Persons over 65:

    • Female: 22,578

    • Male: 18,219

    • Total Elderly: 40,797

  • So: 11,005 (High School Students) + 9,659 (College Students) + 40,797 (65+) = 61,461 total students and elderly in Marin County.

CONTACT US

(415) 763-5047

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© 2019 by NextGen Marin.