Marin County lists coronavirus case count in each city, town

Marin County health officials have disclosed the number of coronavirus cases in each of Marin’s cities, towns and unincorporated communities.


The data, released for the first time on Thursday, show the cumulative number of infections, but do not specify how many people have died or recovered in each community.


San Rafael is the county’s hardest-hit city, with 171 coronavirus infections — more than a third of Marin’s total cases, the data show. Novato has the next-highest number of infections, with 90 cases.


Santa Venetia, an unincorporated area that borders San Rafael, follows with 18 infections. Larkspur has 17 cases, Mill Valley has 15, Corte Madera has 14 and Sausalito has 13. Kentfield and San Anselmo each have 11 cases, and 10 cases were reported in Tamalpais-Homestead Valley, an unincorporated community near Mill Valley.


Fewer than 10 cases each were reported in all other Marin communities. The data do not specify the number of cases when the figure is below 10.


Countywide, 436 people have tested positive for the virus since Marin’s first case was confirmed on March 9, the county reported Thursday. Fourteen of them have died and 289 have recovered.


San Rafael Mayor Gary Phillips said it came as no surprise to learn that his city has more cases than any other in Marin. San Rafael is Marin’s most populated city, and Phillips said it is home to many people working in public-facing businesses that have remained open during the pandemic, including grocery stores, gas stations and car repair shops.

Belvedere Mayor Nancy Kemnitzer said she was “thrilled” to learn that Belvedere has fewer than 10 cases.


Marin’s stay-at-home rules “seem to be paying off” for Belvedere, Kemnitzer said. But she urged residents to continue following the protocols.


“We haven’t seen the end of this yet,” she said.


Public health officials had previously released a map showing the number of coronavirus cases in six geographical regions throughout Marin, but had been unwilling to provide more detailed information.


The county Department of Health and Human Services this month denied the Independent Journal’s public records request seeking a breakdown of cases by city, town and unincorporated community. Deputy County Counsel Valorie Boughey said that “sharing such information publicly would constitute an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy.”


County Supervisor Dennis Rodoni, whose district primarily includes communities with fewer than 10 cases, said this week he didn’t see a benefit to releasing a more detailed breakdown of where infections have been identified.


“Public health and their partners know each case and are working to isolate outbreaks appropriately,” he said. “No matter where you live, individuals should assume COVID-19 is present in their communities and (take) the necessary steps to protect themselves.”


The decision to release more precise data came after health officials said the county tripled its testing capacity over the past three weeks, resulting in a spike in coronavirus diagnoses.


“Now that we have more cases, any one case is less identifiable,” said Dr. Matt Willis, the county’s chief public health officer.


The new data “will enable us to better understand how and where the disease is taking hold and how to prevent its spread,” said county Supervisor Damon Connolly, whose district includes San Rafael. “We must also continue to be aware of and address disproportionate impacts on communities of color and underserved regions within our county.”



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